Feedback: conference special 2018

What did you take away from the Unite-CPHVA annual professional conference this year? We spoke to some of you to find out…

Strengthening child-parent relationships


Understanding Your Child’s Behaviour (UYCB):

Evaluating a Solihull Approach face-to-face 10-week group for parents.

News

Resources

Your journal needs you!

Have you been working on a research paper that you would like to see published?

Web conversation

Health visitor feedback on a structured, behavioural training for working with families of children with behaviour problems

Margiad Williams and Judy Hutchings questioned HVs who delivered a skills programme for parents to effectively address behavioural problems. 

The mother-infant bond: A systematic review of research that includes mothers’ subjective experience of the relationship

Elizabeth Milne, Sally Johnson, Gill Waters and Neil Small explored mothers’ interpretations of their infants’ behaviour, and the impact of ‘mind-mindedness’, or treating a baby as an individual with a mind. 

Opinion

Mark Williams cphva

Conference one-to-one: how are you, dad?

International campaigner for fathers’ mental health Mark Williams shares his story of coming through depression following the birth of his son, and how this experience inspired his fight to raise awareness and bring about change.

NHS Workers iStock

Getting serious about staffing

James Lazou, research officer at Unite, considers the prospect of a long-term NHS workforce plan.

NHS pay – one step at a time

The basic pay journey of NHS staff has had a reset. Sarah Carpenter, Unite’s head of health, asks how the new framework for pay progression affects you.

In Depth

 

Group pic

Feeling stuck? Get creative!

Lab4Living looks at how to enhance the innate design and problem-solving skills of community practitioners. 

Case Crunch iStock

HV caseload crunch

Dave Munday, lead professional officer at Unite, looks at how inflated caseloads are causing health visitors in England to struggle.

SUDI: the bitterest loss

The number of unexpected and unexplained infant deaths has plummeted since the 1990s, but making further reductions now requires more intense and targeted work, writes journalist John Windell.

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