Social media can raise children's unhealthy snack intake

Research from the University of Liverpool has highlighted the negative influence that social media can have on children’s food intake.

Poor sleep in childhood linked to 'bad' cholesterol

Good sleepers in childhood may be healthier adults, according to University of Helsinki research that looked at the effects of different sleep patterns on the health of 1049 adolescents.

Sensory learning helps children eat more healthily

Researchers have found that sensory-based education in nursery children promotes healthier eating habits.

Early-life obesity impacts children's learning and memory

Being obese or overweight in the first two years of life and poorer cognitive ability at school age have been linked by a study, published in the journal Obesity.

Expectation of pain is reality for children

A University of California study, published in Psychosomatic Medicine, saw researchers apply thermal heat to 20 healthy children, 20 with anxiety disorders and 23 adults, asking them to rate the levels of pain.

Higher A&E admissions for children from households with health issues

A new study has found that emergency hospital admissions are more likely for children growing up in homes where an adult has a mental health disorder or an alcohol misuse issue.

The big question: could automation replace health visitor jobs?

Three members give their views on whether automation is good or bad for the profession.

General anaesthetic in children linked to arrested development

A study of more than 210,000 children has found that those exposed to general anaesthesia before the age of four were more likely to fare worse at school than their unexposed peers.

Use of paracetamol in pregnancy increases risk of ADHD and autism

Pregnant women who take paracetamol are up to 30% more likely to have children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research suggests.

Children outperform endurance athletes in recovery

Researchers have discovered how young children can run around all day without getting tired.

Wet wipes could contribute to childhood food allergies

A soapy substance found in wet wipes could leave children more vulnerable to developing allergies, new research shows.

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