What’s happening in the world of public health? We take a look at the latest stories affecting the professions.

Conference tickets on sale and call for abstracts

We're delighted to announce that registration for the Unite-CPHVA 2019 Annual Professional Conference is now open. This year's event will be held in Harrogate on 16 to 17 October, 2019.

The big story: follow the footprints

Today, the average child’s digital footprint is broader than ever. What do community practitioners need to know when it comes to advising parents and helping to safeguard children?

Scotland: HVs bumped up to Band 7 are paid £5k more than rest of UK

New health visitors will be paid ‘significantly more’ than their counterparts in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, under a new deal negotiated by healthcare unions.

Make your voice count

We give you a preview of the CP Readership survey 2019 results so far. Don't agree with the findings to date? Have your say before the deadline…

USA: probiotics don’t help children with acute gastroenteritis

A study across 10 paediatric A&E departments found that giving probiotics to children with gastroenteritis did not help their recovery.

UK: postnatal depression risk far higher in mothers of boys

The odds of developing postnatal depression (PND) increased by up to 79% when mothers had baby boys rather than girls.

Switzerland: nose bacteria may dictate speed of babies’ recovery from their first cold

Babies with a wide variety of different bacteria living in their noses tend to recover more quickly from their first respiratory virus compared with those who have less variety, say researchers.

UK: BMI remains useful gauge of obesity

The body mass index (BMI) remains useful for assessing obesity and health, despite criticism that it cannot distinguish fat from lean mass, a study suggests.

USA: August babies more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD at school

Children who start school as the youngest in their year are far more likely to be diagnosed with ADHD, scientists say.

Canada: most babies don’t sleep through the night

Research has shown that most healthy babies aren’t sleeping through the night – even at one year old.

Northern Ireland: reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, says PHA

The Public Health Agency (PHA) is calling for greater awareness of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) after a new survey found many adults didn’t know about the risk factors.

Scotland: NHS staff become ‘corporate parents’ to vulnerable young

A new ‘corporate parenting’ training resource has been launched for NHS workers to help them understand their duty to promote the interests of young people who are or have been in care.

Wales: staff training budget increases for fifth year in a row

The Welsh Government is to increase its investment in education and training for healthcare professionals in the next financial year by £7m – its fifth consecutive annual rise.

Great Britain: prepare disadvantaged young children for school, HVs told

Health visitors should play a greater role in preparing disadvantaged young children for school, says a new report from the Early Intervention Foundation (EIF).

England: ‘Red book’ and maternity records are going digital

The child health record ‘red book’ is going digital, along with maternity records, under new plans to modernise neonatal and maternity services.

England: children exceed healthy sugar limit by age 10

The average child has already exceeded the maximum sugar intake recommended for an 18-year-old by the time they turn 10, says Public Health England.

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