Health visitors’ experiences of conducting non-visual assessment of unwell pre-school children via the health visiting duty telephone service: an exploratory qualitative study

Debbie Outram and Lesley Dibley asked health visitors to rate the effectiveness of the telephone triage processes they follow, focusing on the heightened risk of an unsuccessful outcome and how that may influence their attitude to the task.

Ethnic health inequalities equate to 20 years' ageing

In 15 out of 17 minority ethnic groups, health-related quality of life in adults aged 55+ was worse on average for women, men, or both, than for white British people, a study has revealed.

Children can learn about health via a school sports programme

Researchers assessed a ‘health education through football’ programme for children aged 10 to 12 in Denmark, looking at the effects on health knowledge and enjoyment levels.

Brain-related visual impairment may affect 1 in 30 children

Cerebral visual impairment (CVI) – a term for a variety of brain-related visual problems previously thought to be rare – may affect one in 30 primary school children. 

Frequent cannabis use by teens linked to drop in IQ

Adolescents who regularly use cannabis may experience a decline in IQ over time, a study in Psychological Medicine has found.

Covid lessons: allies against inequality

Asha Day asks what lessons have been learned about health inequities during the pandemic, and what changes in risk assessments, vaccinations and structural racism are still needed. 

Tinnitus: breaking the waves

It’s a loud and lasting problem for many, and a life-changing issue for a few, writes journalist John Windell. So what is tinnitus and what can be done to restore some peace and quiet?

What lies ahead? The future of practice after Covid

Regardless of how much we dare to hope the beginning of the end of the pandemic is in sight, its ripple effects on the UK’s health and their implications for CPs are just starting. Journalist Anna Scott asks if Covid-19 has changed the professions’ methods forever.

Clinical: Raynaud's syndrome

A common condition that affects around one in six people in the UK, Raynaud’s syndrome, continues to be a hidden illness due to lack of awareness, writes journalist Julie Penfold

Diverse needs: supporting BAME families

BAME people suffer racial discrimination throughout their lives, as highlighted recently by the Black Lives Matter protests. Journalist Linsey Wynton, a mother of three mixed-race children, asks how CPs can best help BAME families.

Obesity: is it everybody's problem?

Can government strategy help tip the scales on the UK’s excess weight, or is there too much onus on the individual? And what do CPs think? Journalist Jo Waters reports.

Clinical: Type 2 diabetes is on the rise

Type 2 diabetes is rife in the UK, even among children, but supporting people to make healthier choices could improve the situation hugely, writes journalist Julie Penfold.

News in numbers: November/December 2020

A breakdown of recent community health news, in numbers. Download the PDF, here

Vaping is not a ‘safer option’ for pregnant women

According to the first known study into the effects of prenatal nicotine exposure on babies, e-cigarettes might not be a safer alternative to smoking during pregnancy.

Women’s attitudes may lead to better Covid compliance

A study across eight countries has revealed that women consider Covid-19 a more serious health problem than men and are more likely to approve of and comply with health policies.

Possible risk of neurological harm to young people from air pollution

Researchers found markers of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s and motor neurone disease in the brainstems of 186 young Mexico City residents aged 11 months to 27 years.

England and Wales: new advice to improve immunity through exercise

Advice for healthcare professionals promoting exercise as a way of supporting immune function has been launched in response to Covid-19.

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