Knife crime: where's the public health approach?

With stabbings at a record high, and public outrage palpable following a spate of deaths, journalist Juliette Astrup asks if the public health approach to youth violence could be forgotten amid the headline-grabbing rhetoric of ‘more boots on the streets’? 

England: new NHS ‘sleep clinic’ boosts families’ wellbeing

A pioneering pilot scheme to help children get a good night’s sleep has boosted the mental health of youngsters and their parents, NHS England has said.

Time for a screen break?

Concerns have been raised that digital devices are now a fundamental part of so many children’s lives, but are there mixed messages around the impact on young people? And how can you help parents navigate the advice? Journalist Georgina Fuller reports.

When the screaming won't stop

Colic and persistent crying can be distressing for babies and parents alike, so what is the latest thinking on the causes
and the best way to deal with it?

Australia: time-out is a positive discipline strategy

A University of Sydney study says that time-out is helpful as a method of discipline for children.

Denmark: MMR vaccine does not cause autism: reconfirmed

The measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine does not cause autism, does not trigger autism in susceptible children and is not associated with clustering of cases following vaccination.

UK: inquiry demands tighter social media regulation

#NewFilters, the first national inquiry examining the impact of social media on young people’s mental health and wellbeing, has called for tighter regulations on social media.

Northern Ireland: specialists to help parent-baby bonding

A new service to support parents struggling to bond with their babies has been offered by two specialist health visitors in infant mental health at the Western Health and Social Care Trust.

Youth violence: a fighting chance

Why is knife and other youth violence on such an upward trajectory, and can a public health approach, which is being hailed as the answer, really help? Journalist Phil Harris investigates.

England: autism not linked to antenatal fish consumption

Eating fish during pregnancy does not increase the likelihood of a child having autism, scientists have found.

OCD: the unwelcome takeover

There is far more to obsessive compulsive disorder than straightening ornaments and checking light switches. Thankfully, awareness is growing. Journalist Georgina Wintersgill reports.

Social media can raise children's unhealthy snack intake

Research from the University of Liverpool has highlighted the negative influence that social media can have on children’s food intake.

Expectation of pain is reality for children

A University of California study, published in Psychosomatic Medicine, saw researchers apply thermal heat to 20 healthy children, 20 with anxiety disorders and 23 adults, asking them to rate the levels of pain.

Use of paracetamol in pregnancy increases risk of ADHD and autism

Pregnant women who take paracetamol are up to 30% more likely to have children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), new research suggests.

Curious children do better in maths and reading

Curious children are better able to grasp basic maths and reading, a study has suggested.

Scotland: ADHD survey reveals inadequate support for families

37,000 children in Scotland are estimated to have ADHD, but only around 5000 receive any treatment

Children with autism at increased risk of vaccine-preventable disease

Children with autism and their younger siblings are less likely to be fully vaccinated, a study shows. 

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