News in numbers: October

A breakdown of community health news this month, in numbers.

Wales: smacking ban splits public down the middle

Public opinion is divided on proposals for a smacking ban.

Big story: power to the people?

Five years after local authorities in England took on responsibility for commissioning public health services, journalist Juliette Astrup asks how councils are reaching out to their communities to shape the local health agenda.

UK: babies that eat solids early sleep better

Babies introduced to solid foods early sleep longer and wake less frequently at night than those exclusively breastfed for the first six months, according to a new study.

Australia: poor body image rises along with children’s hormones

Children as young as eight are vulnerable to poor body image as hormone levels rise with the onset of puberty, new research has found.

Finland: high vitamin D levels linked to lower cholesterol

New research has found a link between higher vitamin D levels and cholesterol levels in primary school children.

UK: babies in prams ‘exposed to more pollution’

Young children in prams can be exposed to up to 60% more pollution than adults because they are lower to the ground and closer to exhaust pipes, a study suggests.

USA: violence in pregnancy predicts aggression in toddlers

Children born to mothers who experience violence in pregnancy are more likely to show aggression towards their mothers as toddlers.

USA: browbeating picky eaters makes no difference to behaviour or weight

Pressuring fussy children to eat food they dislike does not change their behaviour or their weight, a study has found.

England: council will rerun bid process for healthy child programme

Lancashire County Council will re-evaluate its tendering process for school-nursing and health-visiting services after a court blocked its decision to award a £104m contract to Virgin Care.

Wales: make chats about health more effective, NHS workers told

Healthcare professionals can have more effective conversations with patients about improving health and wellbeing through new online training, says Public Health Wales (PHW).

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