SUDI: the bitterest loss

The number of unexpected and unexplained infant deaths has plummeted since the 1990s, but making further reductions now requires more intense and targeted work, writes journalist John Windell.

Feeling stuck? Get creative!

Lab4Living looks at how to enhance the innate design and problem-solving skills of community practitioners. 

Disability: hear to help

In a new series on how you can help clients living with disability – from sensory impairments to mobility issues, journalist Anna Scott looks at hearing loss in children.

Clinical: coping with croup

This viral infection is common and usually harmless, writes journalist John Windell, but a toddler’s barking cough and rasping breathing can still alarm parents.

Rights for refugees

Philomène Uwamaliya defines the role of health visitors, school nurses and community practitioners in advancing the rights and wellbeing of child asylum-seekers and refugees.

The meningitis safety net

Rob Dawson of the Meningitis Research Foundation reveals the life-saving messages parents and CPs need to know if faced with bacterial meningitis or septicaemia.

Parental leave: sharing the load

Julia Waltham of Working Families, the UK’s leading work-life balance organisation, takes us through Shared Parental Leave, and how you can help improve uptake.

A focus on Buddhism

Continuing our series on how religion and culture can impact on practice, Dr Caroline Starkey looks at Buddhism.

GDPR: the transfer of data power

New data protection laws came into force across Europe last month, with major implications for how organisations gather and process personal information. Journalist Juliette Astrup looks at why this matters to you.

Home is where the hurt is

Accidents at home are a leading cause of preventable death for children under five. Katrina Phillips, chief executive of the Child Accident Prevention Trust, asks how you should teach families to avoid harm in the home.

Identifying café au lait spots

How can you identify café au lait spots (CALs) and support parents of children with neurofibromatosis type 1? Health visitor Leah Sweeney explains.

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