Tinnitus: breaking the waves

It’s a loud and lasting problem for many, and a life-changing issue for a few, writes journalist John Windell. So what is tinnitus and what can be done to restore some peace and quiet?

SCPHN training: the big switch

SCPHN learning changed beyond all recognition last year. Nicola Rooke discusses her experiences of undertaking the safeguarding module virtually, and recommendations for safeguarding training for newly qualified HVs.

Pandemic impact: what about the kids?

Young people are emerging as the pandemic’s collateral damage. Their mental health and education are under strain, and their struggles include anxiety, isolation and poverty. Journalist Jo Waters asks what can be done to support them.

Healthcare apps: it's good to chat

Caroline Palmer on how text messaging healthcare app ChatHealth has come into its own, and how community practitioners can embrace digital too.  

What lies ahead? The future of practice after Covid

Regardless of how much we dare to hope the beginning of the end of the pandemic is in sight, its ripple effects on the UK’s health and their implications for CPs are just starting. Journalist Anna Scott asks if Covid-19 has changed the professions’ methods forever.

Student CPs: lessons in resilience

How student health visitors and school nurses found that learning during a pandemic proved to be positive and empowering.

Clinical: Raynaud's syndrome

A common condition that affects around one in six people in the UK, Raynaud’s syndrome, continues to be a hidden illness due to lack of awareness, writes journalist Julie Penfold

Conference special 2020: the heart of public health

Highlights from the Unite-CPHVA 2020 Virtual Annual Professional Conference.

The empty echo: are decision makers acting on BAME concerns?

Decision-makers may listen to BAME concerns, but will they act on them? Asha Day examines the Public Health England report from June, the lessons that have been learned, and those that haven’t.

Diverse needs: supporting BAME families

BAME people suffer racial discrimination throughout their lives, as highlighted recently by the Black Lives Matter protests. Journalist Linsey Wynton, a mother of three mixed-race children, asks how CPs can best help BAME families.

Obesity: is it everybody's problem?

Can government strategy help tip the scales on the UK’s excess weight, or is there too much onus on the individual? And what do CPs think? Journalist Jo Waters reports.

Looking out for looked-after children

GP Jeremy C Gibson and nurse Heather Peet discuss ways to keep this most vulnerable and overlooked sector of society safe and hopeful for the future. 

Clinical: Type 2 diabetes is on the rise

Type 2 diabetes is rife in the UK, even among children, but supporting people to make healthier choices could improve the situation hugely, writes journalist Julie Penfold.

Osteoporosis: the silent disease

A bone fracture is often the first indication of this typically asymptomatic common condition, writes journalist Julie Penfold.

Too young to cope? Helping teenage parents

Health visitor Julie Davidson describes techniques for working with often resistant teenage parents to make a real difference to the outcomes of young families.

The power of touch

In a time of social distancing, children are missing out on some of the physical affection they need to keep their minds healthy, writes Helen Clark

Why is it taking so long to achieve racial equality in healthcare?

The pandemic has impacted BAME groups more severely and exposed yet more disparities. Inequality in healthcare (still) and structural racism in society are some of the reasons. Journalist Linsey Wynton asks why we are still waiting for action.

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