What’s happening in the world of public health? We take a look at the latest stories affecting the professions.

WHO launches summer school on refugee and migrant health

WHO launches summer school on refugee and migrant health

The World Health Organization (WHO) launched its first summer school on refugee and migrant health earlier this month.

Wealthy nations have ethical duty to collect public health data

Wealthy nations have ethical duty to collect public health data

High-income countries must collect public health data to help nations that cannot afford to do the same, the World Health Organization (WHO) has said.

Health services in rest of UK could 'learn lessons' from Scotland

Health services in rest of UK could 'learn lessons' from Scotland

The NHS in England, Wales and Northern Ireland could learn lessons on improving quality and safety of patient care from the Scottish health service, according to a report.

More health visitors needed to tackle maternal obesity

More health visitors needed to tackle maternal obesity

An increase in the number of health visitors is needed to reduce maternal obesity, a group of cross-party MPs have said.

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Children with TVs in their bedrooms more likely to be overweight

Researchers from University College London analysed data on 12,556 children from the UK’s Millennium Cohort Study, following them from ages seven to 11 to assess long-term associations between TV and computer use and body fat in children.

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Messy family break-ups can increase risk to child health

Children of parents who had an acrimonious separation are more susceptible to colds in adulthood,

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Mental abuse impacts more than domestic abuse

Growing up in a home with psychological abuse has longer-term effects on young people’s wellbeing than domestic violence, according to a new study from Ireland.

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Parents love of tech could affect children's behaviour

Could parents spending too much time on their smartphones or tablets lead to behavioural problems in children?

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City life could present psychosis risk for teens

Living in a city could make young people more vulnerable to psychotic experiences, according to a UK study. 

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Television isn’t the enemy, says study

Most children aged five can watch up to three hours of television a day with few ill effects to their language skills by the time they leave primary school, new research suggests.

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